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HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION RESEARCH:
SAVING AND IMPROVING LIVES. CREATING SURVIVORS.

Heart and Stroke Foundation researchers work relentlessly to improve the health of every Canadian family, every day. Their discoveries prevent disease, save lives and promote recovery. Read some of their stories below.

PREVENTING DISEASE – CHILDREN AND YOUTH


Making heart health child’s play
Dr. Heather McKay is reshaping a community ─ and the heart health of its children ─ by making it easier for kids to be physically active.


Investing in your grandchildren’s health
A groundbreaking new study is aimed at revealing the root causes of chronic disease. The answers could save lives for generations to come.

PREVENTING DISEASE – ADULTS


Giving women a second chance
Dr. Karin Humphries is studying why women lag behind men in recovering after a heart attack – and how we can close that gender gap.


Cracking cholesterol’s code
Dr. Gordon Francis changed our understanding of cholesterol’s role in heart disease. Now he’s building on that work to prevent heart attacks.

SAVING LIVES – CARDIAC EMERGENCY


Stopping cardiac arrest before it happens
Dr. Andrew Krahn is working to save lives by uncovering the DNA sequences behind LQTS, a rare condition that puts healthy people at risk of sudden death.


Improving the odds after cardiac arrest
Cardiac arrest can occur without warning. Most victims die before reaching hospital. A massive study is laying the groundwork to help more survive.

SAVING LIVES – STROKE RESPONSE


Chasing the next breakthrough
Dr. Edward Pryzdial is studying a new clot-busting drug with the potential to give stroke patients safer, faster and more effective treatment.


Putting stroke on ice
Drs. Stephen Lownie and David Pelz are investigating how cooling parts of the brain could help reduce stroke damage and save lives.

PROMOTING RECOVERY


Using robotics for stroke recovery
Dr. Sean Dukelow is developing innovative ways to assess stroke damage, remap the brain and restore function, giving new hope to survivors.


A better pill to swallow
Dr. Eva Lonn is researching a “polypill” — a single capsule that could replace multiple meds and help heart disease and stroke survivors recover.


Heart and Stroke Foundation research milestones that matter